Join the Community

Follow Along

Never Miss a thing...

Enter your email address to be updated with new posts:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Honour the Child

BTRT Patterns (on Etsy)

Tuesday, 17 November 2009
I was thrilled to snag a copy of Carina Spencer's (Sweet Mama Small Sugar) Bel Cloche hat pattern.

I had purchase some lovely Willow BFL in 'Mercado' ~ Rowan picked it and it totally reminds me of the old Fruit Chiclets!

Carina's pattern is lovely~ easy to follow, not too complicated, while offering some very pretty patterning (like the lace brim).

The result is very pretty, but a little on the large size (totally my fault, didn't do a gauge swatch and I am a novice with circular kntting ~ learned Magic Loop for this).

I guess big is better than small, right?Reminds me of this Fat Albert character:But roll up the brim and it isn't so bad!

I think this would be lovely done in a light cotton for the summer, too. Maybe the right size, next time!
Tuesday, 3 November 2009
Yes, among the toys in our house, silk is a survivor!

I have recently answered a few queries from parents new to natural toys that were concerned with the durability of silk for child's play. And I am always happy to expound on its amazing qualities!

In our own home, we still play with the very same first set of silks we have had for 3 years (with an occassional newbie for variety). This group was my first silk dyeing experiment and they are all still bright and good to go. They have been toted about to play groups and preschools, for storytelling at church and camp (and been cleaned accordingly). The picture of Rowan as 'Rainbow Girl' on her bike this September shows our original set in use. Other than a snag here and there there are no issues and they are buttery soft from all the love.

While not as strong as spider's silk (which I once read could stop a 747 jet in flight if strung in a fiber the width of one pencil!), silkworm silk is one of the strongest natural fibers. It does lose up to 20% of its strength when wet (so always treat wet silk gently) but when dry it it tough (and lacking much elasticity it holds its shape).

Our playsilks are generally made with 8mm (momme ~ 'mommy') silk, which is airy, lightweight but not transclucent (and weightier than most commercial playsilks). I love that it is breathable and little ones can see through it enough to steer when being ghosts and hiding for hide and seek.

Silk is a protein fiber, and therefore best cared for as you would your own hair: mild washing (we use dish soap), gentle squeezing and allow to air dry.

With proper care, your playsilks should last for many years of mud puddles, tangling in bike chains, being puppy costumes and picnic blankets, forts and sacks for collecting rocks! We don't baby our silk and it hasn't failed us yet.

I love that in a toy!
To learn more about silkies, check out past posts HERE.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Search This Blog

Sponsor :: Inspiring Blog

Sponsor :: Stoneware Pottery

Sponsor :: Handmade Women's Wear

Playsilk Primer

Join the Link Party!

Go Creative!

Supply Kit for Silk Fairy Mobile DIY

Supply Kit for Silk Dolly DIY